Facts, figures and visuals on survey respondent demographics

On this page


Age

This graph shows the age profile of respondents.


Gender and sexuality

These graphs show how respondents describe their gender, variations in sex characteristics and sexual orientation.

These are new questions to support Workplace Gender Audits, in addition to existing People matter survey questions on gender equality.

Under the Gender Equality Act 2020, organisations have obligations to promote gender equality in the workplace.

Gender

This graph shows the gender identity of respondents.

Trans, non-binary or gender diverse

This graph shows a breakdown of respondents who identify as trans, non-binary or gender diverse.

We combined the percentage of respondents who answered ‘yes’ to identifying as trans, non-binary and gender diverse to maintain anonymity.

Innate variations of sex characteristics (often called intersex)

This graph shows the respondents who said they had innate variations of sex characteristics.

Sexual orientation

This graph shows the sexual orientation of respondents.


Highest level of education

This graph shows the highest level of education of respondents.


Service in the Australian Defence Force

This graph shows the respondents who serve in the Australian Defence Force.


Caring responsibilities

This graph shows the caring responsibilities respondents have.

The Carers Recognition Act 2021 helps protect care relationships and the role of carers in the community.

The results may add up to more than 100% because respondents could choose more than one answer.


Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

This graph shows the percentage of respondents who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.


Cultural diversity

Born in Australia vs not born in Australia

This graph shows the percentage of respondents who were born in Australia.

When respondents first arrived in Australia

This graph shows when respondents first arrived in Australia.

Graph 1 of 2: Language other than English

This first graph shows the percentage of respondents who speak a language other than English with their family or community.

Graph 2 of 2: Languages spoken

In this final graph, respondents who speak a language other than English said what other language they speak.

It shows the top 20 most common languages other than English in Australia as reported by the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016.

The results may add up to more than 100% because respondents could choose more than one answer.

Additional languages

This data shows the languages with 30 or more responses.

Languages spoken Percentage of respondents
Hindi 9.9%
Mandarin 9.5%
Italian 8.9
Cantonese 7.5%
Greek 6.6%
Filipino 5.1%
Spanish 4.5%
Vietnamese 4.3%
Arabic 3.9%
Punjabi 3.6%
French 3.5%
Tamil 3.4%
German 3%
Sinhalese 2.9%
Malayalam 2.3%
Urdu 2.1%
Tagalog 2%
Macedonian 1.9%
Indonesian 1.8%
Polish 1%
Turkish 1%
Croatian 0.9
Russian 0.9%
Korean 0.8%
Australian Indigenous Language 0.8%
Telugu 0.8%
Dutch 0.7%
Serbian 0.7%
Japanese 0.6%
Nepali 0.6%
Maltese 0.6%
Malay 0.6%
Bengali 0.6%
Gujarati 0.6%
Portuguese 0.6%
Afrikaans 0.5%
AUSLAN 0.5%
Thai 0.5%
Farsi 0.4%
Marathi 0.4%
Hungarian 0.4%
Samoan 0.3%
Khmer 0.3%
Persian 0.3%
Kannada 0.3%
Shona 0.2%
Hakka 0.2%
Hebrew 0.2%
Romanian 0.2%
Nepalese 0.2%

Cultural identity

This shows the cultural identities nominated by respondents.

The results may add up to more than 100% because respondents could choose more than one answer.

Religion

This graph shows the religion of respondents.


Disability

The Victorian Government has a plan to increase the number of people with disability in the public sector called Getting to work.

Getting to work is Victoria’s long-term employment plan for people with disability in the public sector.

The plan supports a target of 6% representation of people with disability in the Victorian Public Service by 2020 and 12% by 2025.

30,243 people or 50% of the Victorian Public Service completed the People matter survey in 2021.

5.6% of respondents identified as a person with disability.

In the survey, we define disability to include long-term (lasting 6 months or more) physical, mental health, intellectual, neurological or sensory impairments which, in interaction with various attitudinal and environmental barriers, may hinder full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.

Graph 1 of 3: People with disability

This graph shows the respondents who identify as a person with disability.

Graph 2 of 3: Shared disability information with their organisation

In this second graph, respondents who identified as a person with disability said if they shared their disability information with their organisation.

Graph 3 of 3: Why respondents didn’t share their disability information with their organisations

In this final graph, respondents who identified as a person with disability said why they didn’t share their disability information with their organisation.

The results may add up to more than 100% because respondents could choose more than one answer.


Adjustments

In the survey, we define adjustments as to allow employees to work safely and effectively in line with the Equal Opportunity Act 2010.

They can include adjustments to:

  • working hours
  • regular breaks or non-standard equipment, such as standing desk, screen reader, vertical mouse, Auslan interpreter, accessible lift, lighting, ramps.

Graph 1 of 3: Type of adjustments

This first graph shows the type of adjustments respondents asked for to help them do their work.

The results may add up to more than 100% because respondents could choose more than one answer.

Graph 2 of 3: Reasons for adjustments

In this second graph, respondents who asked for an adjustment said why they asked for them.

The results may add up to more than 100% because respondents could choose more than one answer.

Graph 3 of 3: Experience asking for adjustments

In this final graph, respondents who asked for an adjustment said how they felt when their adjustments weren’t made.

Under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and Equal Opportunity Act 2010, employers must make adjustments for employees with disability unless it may result in unjustifiable hardship.


Working arrangements

This graph shows the percentage of respondents who have working arrangements that are:

  • fixed-term
  • ongoing or executive
  • other, which includes temporary, casual and sessional.

Full-time vs part-time

This graph shows if respondents work full-time or part-time.


Gross base salary

This graph shows the gross base salary of respondents.

Casual employees were not asked this question.


Length of employment

This graph shows how long respondents have worked for their current employer.


Management responsibilities

This graph shows the management responsibilities of respondents.


Work location

This graph shows the respondent’s primary work location in the 3 months prior to responding to the survey.

Primary workplace in 2021

This graph shows the respondent’s primary workplace in the 3 months prior to responding to this survey.

Due to the coronavirus (COVD-19) pandemic, many respondents worked from home or other locations.