This document is part of the Aboriginal Employment Resources resource.

Section 5 of the Barring Djinang launch brochure
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Ongoing attraction and recruitment challenges

Challenges identified from research

  • Low representation and supply at all levels
  • Limited application success dissuading Aboriginal applicants from applying or re- applying
  • Culturally appropriate recruitment practice is not systemic

Why this is important for us to address

  • Ongoing attraction issues if no action is taken
  • Current pipeline is likely to be insufficient to meet employment target.

Our strategic response

Improve attraction and recruitment

Strategic focus on the employee lifecycle

Inconsistent career experiences and opportunities

Challenges identified from research

  • Low numbers of senior level Aboriginal staff
  • Previous focus on representation led to perverse outcomes, including low quality workplace experiences for many Aboriginal staff
  • Aboriginal staff report generally low level of support to develop the career that they want

Why this is important for us to address

  • Lack of support for career development limits self-determination of Aboriginal staff within the workplace
  • Self-determination of Aboriginal Victorians will be supported by a greater number of senior Aboriginal staff in the public sector, and enhanced leadership capacity in the Aboriginal community controlled sector
  • Opportunities to extend pathways into the sector from existing initiatives like Jobs Victoria

Our strategic response

Create progressive career experiences

Shift from quantity to quality

Lack of culturally safe and aware work cultures

Challenges identified from research

  • Not all public officials and employers meet responsibilities contained in public sector values, employment principles and Human Rights Charter in respect to Aboriginal employment
  • Aboriginal staff expectations of the workplace are not being met in all cases: high rates of bullying and harassment; lateral violence; high cultural load; variable cultural awareness of managers

Why this is important for us to address

  • Too much focus on what Aboriginal staff need to do and not what non-Aboriginal people need to do continues the status quo
  • Aboriginal people have a right to enjoy their culture at all times, including in the workplace.
  • Self-determination will be supported by increased cultural capability of the public sector

Our strategic response

Invest in workplace cultural capability

Enhanced cultural capability across the sector

Limited access to support

Challenges identified from research

  • Aboriginal staff networks are valuable, but more support is needed
  • Existing support mechanisms may not be culturally appropriate

Why this is important for us to address

  • If Aboriginal staff do not receive the support they need to perform, develop or lead in the workplace, this may lead to limited engagement and satisfaction with career

Our strategic response

Enhanced support for Aboriginal staff

Access to networks for development and personal support

Lack of central governance and oversight

Challenges identified from research

  • Siloed approaches to outcomes due to lack of a coordinated approach
  • Previous strategy provided learnings about the need for strong governance and oversight

Why this is important for us to address

  • Need a strategic focus from the centre on the most problematic aspects of the workforce lifecycle
  • Without consistency, approaches may be limited in efficacy at the whole of sector level

Our strategic response

Central oversight and strong governance

Demonstrate leadership and commitment