This document is part of the Great Managers, Great Results resource.

There are six steps your managers need to undertake to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours required for success in their current and future management roles.

Your fundamental task is to talk to your managers at each step. The purpose of these conversations is to ensure managers become accountable for their own development and remain focused on achieving tangible and valuable outcomes for the development they undertake.

The Victorian Public Sector Commission has prepared a suite of materials to support the development of managers in the Victorian Public Sector. These materials include two planning templates that you can ask your managers to complete.

After your managers have completed these templates, you will have all the material you need to commence, structure and conduct a productive conversation about their development.

Step 1: Managers identify their own development needs and goals

A key role for you to play here is to ‘hold the mirror’ for the manager as part of their self-assessment.

To assist you can take the following actions.

  • Ask your managers to complete the Management knowledge, skills and behaviours self-assessment (included in Self Asssessment and Development Planning Template for Victorian Public Sector Managers)
  • Ask your managers to complete the Development Planning Tool, parts A and B
  • Set up a time to discuss their completed Management knowledge, skills and behaviours self-assessment, providing your own perspective on their strengths and areas where further development will be of value.

Step 2: Managers identify options for development available to them

A key role for you to play here is to help managers identify a number of development activities that will provide the opportunity to learn through action, experience, making mistakes, reflection and trying different things.

To assist you can take the following actions.

  • Ask your managers to complete the Development planning tool, parts C, D and E
  • Set up a time to discuss with your managers their completed Development planning tool (parts C, D and E). Give them feedback on the opportunities for on-the-job learning and other development experiences you may be able to create for them.

Step 3: Managers plan to undertake development activities

A key role for you to play here is to help managers remain focused on the reasons why they are undertaking development activities and to create the ‘space’ for development to occur.

To assist you can take the following actions.

  • Ask your managers to complete the Development planning tool, parts F and G.
  • Set up a time to discuss with your managers their completed Development planning tool, parts F and G. Give feedback on the thoroughness of their preparation for their development activities.

Step 4: Managers undertake development activities

A key role for you to play here is, again, to help managers remain focused on the reasons why they are undertaking development activities and to ensure they have the ‘space’ for development to occur.

You also have a role in helping managers gain the most from the development activities by providing the opportunity for them to debrief with you about the experience.

To assist you can take the following actions.

  • If the development activity requires some time away from everyday work, actively discourage the manager’s staff or colleagues from contacting them while the manager is participating in the development activity.
  • Contact the manager during the development activity to discuss how the activity is going. Is it on track to achieve the development goals?

Step 5: Managers apply newly acquired knowledge, skills and behaviours in their work

A key role for you to play here is ensure managers have the ‘space’ to apply newly acquired knowledge, skills and behaviours, and actually do so.

To assist you can take the following actions.

  • Set up a time to ask your manager what new knowledge, skills or behaviours they have developed and exactly how they will apply these back in their work.
  • Establish an opportunity (for example, at a staff meeting) for the manager to give a presentation about what they learnt and how they will apply this in their work.
  • Provide feedback on any positive change you have noticed in the manager’s abilities or behaviours since they participated in a development activity.

Step 6: Managers repeat steps 1-5.