Results from a baseline gender audit and the People matter survey 2021

Understanding our data

The Commission undertook a baseline gender audit using data as at 30 June 2021. We extracted workforce data from internal systems and collected employee experience data via the People Matter Survey. We submitted the data to the Commission for Gender Equality in the Public Sector on 1 December 2021.

Workplace gender audit data is broken down separately for women and men.

To protect the anonymity of our staff, we have not released any data for individuals who identify as non-binary or self-describe their gender. This is because we have fewer than 10 staff in this group.

A person with a self-described gender may identify as non-binary, trans, gender diverse, agender, genderqueer, genderfluid or using any other term.

The audit data reflects some intersectionality, considering how gender inequality may be compounded by the impacts of disadvantage and discrimination that someone might experience on the basis of Aboriginality, age or disability.

The complete workplace gender audit dataset is available at vpsc.vic.gov.au. The dataset excludes personal and potentially identifying information. This protects the anonymity and safety of employees. We uphold privacy protocols by not publishing the analysis of de-identified individuals or datasets from small groups.

There are some data gaps. We plan to establish remaining data sets regarding intersectionality, for example ethnicity, cultural identity, religion and sexual orientation. This would build capacity to allow more nuanced analysis in future.

In places, we compare the Commission’s workforce data to Victorian public sector and Victorian Public Service workforce data in State of the Public Sector 2021.

Summary of results 2021

We analysed the results according to 7 gender equality indicators.

  1. Gender composition of all levels of the workforce
  2. Gender composition of the governing body
  3. Equal remuneration for work of equal or comparable value across all levels, irrespective of gender
  4. Sexual harassment in the workplace
  5. Recruitment and promotion practices in the workplace
  6. Availability and utilisation of terms, conditions and practices relating to family violence leave, flexible working arrangements and working arrangements supporting workers with family or caring responsibilities
  7. Gendered segregation in the workplace.

Indicator 1: Gender composition of all levels of the workforce

Key points:

  • The Commission has a workforce of 114 people and 75 are women
  • The overall gender composition is 66% women, lower than in the Victorian public sector (68% women) and higher than in the Victorian Public Service (59% women)
  • 50% of Executives are women (3 women)
  • Up to 21% of people may experience intersectional gender inequality, for example on the basis of Aboriginality, disability or age
  • 85% of part-time ongoing and 100% of part-time fixed roles are women
  • 61% of full-time ongoing and 63% of full-time fixed roles are women

Notes:

  • Charts display gender differently according to source data
  • Where charts show a statement, the percentage reflects how strongly people agree with the statement (e.g. gender is not a barrier to success)

Data source: workplace gender audit 30 June 2021 and People matter survey 2021

Data source: People matter survey 2021


Data source: workplace gender audit 30 June 2021


Data source: workplace gender audit 30 June 2021

Indicator 2: Gender composition of the governing body

The Commission did not submit data about its governing body in the baseline gender audit. Its Advisory Board currently consists of the Secretary, Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC) as chairperson. There are no other members at present. At the time this plan was written, the membership of the Advisory Board was being reviewed by the VPSC and DPC.

Indicator 3: Equal remuneration for work of equal or comparable value across all levels, irrespective of gender

Key points:

  • The Commission’s overall gender pay gap is 11.6%, higher than the overall Victorian Public Service pay gap of 2.0% and overall Victorian public sector pay gap of 9.3%
  • There is a negative pay gap at Executive level and VPS 3 to 4 levels

Notes:

  • The overall gender pay gap is calculated using median base salary
  • The CEO (Commissioner) level is not included in overall pay gap to avoid skewing
  • When calculated using mean base salary, the pay gap is 3.2%
  • Mean pay for VPS 1-2 and people with self-described gender is not shown in the table below due to privacy requirements surrounding use of small datasets

Data source: workplace gender audit 30 June 2021 and State of the public sector 2021

Data source: workplace gender audit 30 June 2021 and State of the public sector 2021

Indicator 4: Sexual harassment in the workplace

Key points:

  • According to the People Matter Survey, 5 respondents in the organisation experienced or witnessed sexual harassment during the reporting period
  • No formal complaints were made during the reporting period


Data source: People matter survey 2021

Indicator 5: Recruitment and promotion practices in the workplace

Key points:

  • Fewer women (45%) than men (68%) feel like they have an equal chance of promotion in the workplace
  • Fewer women (69%) than men (71%) feel that the organisation makes fair recruitment and promotion decisions based on merit
  • Fewer women (63%) than men (86%) feel that there are adequate opportunities to develop their skills and experience
  • Fewer women (57%) than men (82%) feel that their learning and development needs have been addressed

Data source: People matter survey 2021

Indicator 6: Availability and utilisation of terms, conditions and practices relating to family violence leave, flexible working arrangements and working arrangements supporting workers with family or caring responsibilities

Key points:

  • Most people say using flexible work is not a barrier to success in this organisation
  • 75% of women and 80% of men say having a disability is not a barrier to success in this organisation
  • 73% of women say having caring responsibilities is not a barrier to success

Data source: People matter survey 2021

Indicator 7: Gendered segregation in the workplace

Key points:

  • Women are more likely to work in professional or clerical roles
  • More men than women are managers
  • 20% of professional roles, 25% of clerical roles and 64% of manager roles are held by men

Notes:

  • Terms relate to employment type, classified according to ANZSCO framework which may differ from employment level or job title
  • Professional roles within the Commission include arts, media, business, human resources, marketing, design and information communication technology
  • Clerical roles within the Commission include office managers and program administrators, personal assistants, office support workers and administration
  • Management roles within the Commission include chief executives, general managers, legislators and specialist managers

Data source: workplace gender audit 30 June 2021